RABGEF1 Gene Profile

Aliases: FLJ32302, RABEX5, rabex-5, RABGEF1

General Details

Description

RAB guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 1; Rab5 GDP/GTP exchange factor

Gene Type

protein-coding

Taxonomy and Organism Information

Homo sapiens (scientific name), human (genbank common name), man (common name)

Physical Location Details

Chromosome (7), Map Location (7q11.21)

Gene Ontology (GO)

External Identifiers (ID's from other Repositories)

Protein Interactions

Bait GeneHit GeneExperimental SystemPublication
RAB4ARABGEF1Affinity Capture-MSRual JF et al.
RNF11RABGEF1Affinity Capture-MSRual JF et al.
RABGEF1C19orf50Affinity Capture-WesternRual JF et al.
RABGEF1RAB4AInvitrode Renzis S et al.
RABGEF1RABEP1InvitroMattera R et al.
RABGEF1RAB4AInvivode Renzis S et al.
RABGEF1C19orf50Two-hybridRual JF et al.

NCBI Protein Accessions and Genbank Identifiers (GI)

NCBI Nucleotide (mRNA/cDNA) Accessions and Genbank Identifiers (GI)

UniGENE Identifiers

Hs.530053

Publication References and Citations

Crystal structure of the ubiquitin binding domains of rabex-5 reveals two modes of interaction with ubiquitin.
Penengo L, Mapelli M, Murachelli AG, Confalonieri S, Magri L, Musacchio A, Di Fiore PP, Polo S, Schneider TR
The interaction between ubiquitinated proteins and intracellular proteins harboring ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs) is critical to a multitude of cellular processes. Here, we report that Rabex-5, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5, binds to Ub through two independent UBDs. These UBDs determine a number of properties of Rabex-5, including its coupled monoubiquitination and interaction in vivo with ubiquitinated EGFRs. Structural and biochemical characterization of the UBDs of Rabex-5 revealed that one of them (MIU, motif interacting with ubiquitin) binds to Ub with modes superimposable to those of the UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif):Ub interaction, although in the opposite orientation. The other UBD, RUZ (Rabex-5 ubiquitin binding zinc finger) binds to a surface of Ub centered on Asp58(Ub) and distinct from the "canonical" Ile44(Ub)-based surface. The two binding surfaces allow Ub to interact simultaneously with different UBDs, thus opening new perspectives in Ub-mediated signaling.
Cell Mar (2006); 6(124): 1183-95
Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network.
Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, Hirozane-Kishikawa T, Dricot A, Li N, Berriz GF, Gibbons FD, Dreze M, Ayivi-Guedehoussou N, Klitgord N, Simon C, Boxem M, Milstein S, Rosenberg J, Goldberg DS, Zhang LV, Wong SL, Franklin G, Li S, Albala JS, Lim J, Fraughton C, Llamosas E, Cevik S, Bex C, Lamesch P, Sikorski RS, Vandenhaute J, Zoghbi HY, Smolyar A, Bosak S, Sequerra R, Doucette-Stamm L, Cusick ME, Hill DE, Roth FP, Vidal M
Systematic mapping of protein-protein interactions, or 'interactome' mapping, was initiated in model organisms, starting with defined biological processes and then expanding to the scale of the proteome. Although far from complete, such maps have revealed global topological and dynamic features of interactome networks that relate to known biological properties, suggesting that a human interactome map will provide insight into development and disease mechanisms at a systems level. Here we describe an initial version of a proteome-scale map of human binary protein-protein interactions. Using a stringent, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system, we tested pairwise interactions among the products of approximately 8,100 currently available Gateway-cloned open reading frames and detected approximately 2,800 interactions. This data set, called CCSB-HI1, has a verification rate of approximately 78% as revealed by an independent co-affinity purification assay, and correlates significantly with other biological attributes. The CCSB-HI1 data set increases by approximately 70% the set of available binary interactions within the tested space and reveals more than 300 new connections to over 100 disease-associated proteins. This work represents an important step towards a systematic and comprehensive human interactome project.
Nature Oct (2005); 7062(437): 1173-8
Proteomic, functional, and domain-based analysis of in vivo 14-3-3 binding proteins involved in cytoskeletal regulation and cellular organization.
Jin J, Smith FD, Stark C, Wells CD, Fawcett JP, Kulkarni S, Metalnikov P, O'Donnell P, Taylor P, Taylor L, Zougman A, Woodgett JR, Langeberg LK, Scott JD, Pawson T
BACKGROUND: 14-3-3 proteins are abundant and conserved polypeptides that mediate the cellular effects of basophilic protein kinases through their ability to bind specific peptide motifs phosphorylated on serine or threonine. RESULTS: We have used mass spectrometry to analyze proteins that associate with 14-3-3 isoforms in HEK293 cells. This identified 170 unique 14-3-3-associated proteins, which show only modest overlap with previous 14-3-3 binding partners isolated by affinity chromatography. To explore this large set of proteins, we developed a domain-based hierarchical clustering technique that distinguishes structurally and functionally related subsets of 14-3-3 target proteins. This analysis revealed a large group of 14-3-3 binding partners that regulate cytoskeletal architecture. Inhibition of 14-3-3 phosphoprotein recognition in vivo indicates the general importance of such interactions in cellular morphology and membrane dynamics. Using tandem proteomic and biochemical approaches, we identify a phospho-dependent 14-3-3 binding site on the A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho GTPase. 14-3-3 binding to AKAP-Lbc, induced by PKA, suppresses Rho activation in vivo. CONCLUSION: 14-3-3 proteins can potentially engage around 0.6% of the human proteome. Domain-based clustering has identified specific subsets of 14-3-3 targets, including numerous proteins involved in the dynamic control of cell architecture. This notion has been validated by the broad inhibition of 14-3-3 phosphorylation-dependent binding in vivo and by the specific analysis of AKAP-Lbc, a RhoGEF that is controlled by its interaction with 14-3-3.
Curr. Biol. Aug (2004); 16(14): 1436-50
Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.
Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T, Sugano S
As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.
Nat. Genet. Jan (2004); 1(36): 40-5
Divalent interaction of the GGAs with the Rabaptin-5-Rabex-5 complex.
Mattera R, Arighi CN, Lodge R, Zerial M, Bonifacino JS
Cargo transfer from trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived transport carriers to endosomes involves a still undefined set of tethering/fusion events. Here we analyze a molecular interaction that may play a role in this process. We demonstrate that the GGAs, a family of Arf-dependent clathrin adaptors involved in selection of TGN cargo, interact with the Rabaptin-5-Rabex-5 complex, a Rab4/Rab5 effector regulating endosome fusion. These interactions are bipartite: GGA-GAE domains recognize an FGPLV sequence (residues 439-443) in a predicted random coil of Rabaptin-5 (a sequence also recognized by the gamma1- and gamma2-adaptin ears), while GGA-GAT domains bind to the C-terminal coiled-coils of Rabaptin-5. The GGA-Rabaptin-5 interaction decreases binding of clathrin to the GGA-hinge domain, and expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Rabaptin-5 shifts the localization of endogenous GGA1 and associated cargo to enlarged early endosomes. These observations thus identify a binding sequence for GAE/gamma-adaptin ear domains and reveal a functional link between proteins regulating TGN cargo export and endosomal tethering/fusion events.
EMBO J. Jan (2003); 1(22): 78-88
Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.
Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, Derge JG, Klausner RD, Collins FS, Wagner L, Shenmen CM, Schuler GD, Altschul SF, Zeeberg B, Buetow KH, Schaefer CF, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Jordan H, Moore T, Max SI, Wang J, Hsieh F, Diatchenko L, Marusina K, Farmer AA, Rubin GM, Hong L, Stapleton M, Soares MB, Bonaldo MF, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brownstein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Prange C, Raha SS, Loquellano NA, Peters GJ, Abramson RD, Mullahy SJ, Bosak SA, McEwan PJ, McKernan KJ, Malek JA, Gunaratne PH, Richards S, Worley KC, Hale S, Garcia AM, Gay LJ, Hulyk SW, Villalon DK, Muzny DM, Sodergren EJ, Lu X, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madan A, Young AC, Shevchenko Y, Bouffard GG, Blakesley RW, Touchman JW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Krzywinski MI, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Marra MA,
The National Institutes of Health Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) Program is a multiinstitutional effort to identify and sequence a cDNA clone containing a complete ORF for each human and mouse gene. ESTs were generated from libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs and analyzed to identify candidate full-ORF clones, which then were sequenced to high accuracy. The MGC has currently sequenced and verified the full ORF for a nonredundant set of >9,000 human and >6,000 mouse genes. Candidate full-ORF clones for an additional 7,800 human and 3,500 mouse genes also have been identified. All MGC sequences and clones are available without restriction through public databases and clone distribution networks (see http:mgc.nci.nih.gov).
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. Dec (2002); 26(99): 16899-903
Divalent Rab effectors regulate the sub-compartmental organization and sorting of early endosomes.
de Renzis S, Sonnichsen B, Zerial M
The three GTPases Rab5, Rab4 and Rab11 regulate sequential transport steps along the endocytic/recycling pathway, and occupy distinct membrane domains on early and recycling endosomes. To address the mechanisms that regulate communication between such domains, we searched for proteins that interact with both Rab5 and Rab4. Here, we report that Rabenosyn-5, a previously identified Rab5 effector, also binds to Rab4. Rabenosyn-5 overexpression increased the association between Rab5 and Rab4 endosomal domains and decreased the fraction of Rab4- and Rab11-positive structures. This redistribution was accompanied by a faster rate of transferrin recycling from early endosomes to the cell surface and reduced transport to Rab11-containing perinuclear recycling endosomes. These effects depend on the ability of Rabenosyn-5 to interact with Rab4. We propose that divalent Rab effectors regulate protein sorting and recycling by connecting Rab domains on early endosomes.
Nat. Cell Biol. Feb (2002); 2(4): 124-33
Seven genes that are differentially transcribed in colorectal tumor cell lines.
Nimmrich I, Erdmann S, Melchers U, Finke U, Hentsch S, Moyer MP, Hoffmann I, Muller O
To identify genes which are differentially transcribed in colorectal tumor cells, we compared the two human tumor cell lines, SW480 and HCT116, with the cell line, NCM460, from normal colon epithelium as a control. Using the methods of differential display reverse transcription PCR and Northern blot hybridization, we detected the differential transcription of seven genes: cholecystokinin, reticulocalbin, Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabex5, caldesmon, differentiation related gene 1 (drg1), taxol resistant associated gene 3 (Trag-3) and the gene for the placental protein, diff33. The yet unidentified cDNA of the human Rabex5 gene and the 3' untranslated region of the human caldesmon gene were cloned.
Cancer Lett. Nov (2000); 1(160): 37-43
Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library.
Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K, Suyama A, Sugano S
Using 'oligo-capped' mRNA [Maruyama, K., Sugano, S., 1994. Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides. Gene 138, 171-174], whose cap structure was replaced by a synthetic oligonucleotide, we constructed two types of cDNA library. One is a 'full length-enriched cDNA library' which has a high content of full-length cDNA clones and the other is a '5'-end-enriched cDNA library', which has a high content of cDNA clones with their mRNA start sites. The 5'-end-enriched library was constructed especially for isolating the mRNA start sites of long mRNAs. In order to characterize these libraries, we performed one-pass sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones from both libraries (84 clones for the full length-enriched cDNA library and 159 clones for the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library). The cDNA clones of the polypeptide chain elongation factor 1 alpha were most frequently (nine clones) isolated, and more than 80% of them (eight clones) contained the mRNA start site of the gene. Furthermore, about 80% of the cDNA clones of both libraries whose sequence matched with known genes had the known 5' ends or sequences upstream of the known 5' ends (28 out of 35 for the full length-enriched library and 51 out of 62 for the 5'-end-enriched library). The longest full-length clone of the full length-enriched cDNA library was about 3300 bp (among 28 clones). In contrast, seven clones (out of the 51 clones with the mRNA start sites) from the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library came from mRNAs whose length is more than 3500 bp. These cDNA libraries may be useful for generating 5' ESTs with the information of the mRNA start sites that are now scarce in the EST database.
Gene Oct (1997); 1(200): 149-56